A Humble Guitar Building Thread

Discussion in 'Project Depot' started by rrobbone, May 10, 2015.

  1. brattmatter

    brattmatter Well-Known Member Supporting Member+

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    Just a flesh wound.

    Best of luck to you. I can't wait to see these. Please link the tdp thread.

    What wood type will be your focus? I'm hoping for some light pine or, even better, my favorite, paulownia.
     
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  2. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    No, nothing to report. Life's been busy, and I spent my one "free time" day this week taking the wife on a photography trip so she could put the camera I bought her for mother's day through it's paces. Tonight or tomorrow I'll be ordering a Tele neck so I can start my pine test bodies. I have all the other hardware I need. The templates are done except for a couple of spots which still need finish sanding.

    I put that B-stock SX tele Kurt posted in my cart yesterday, I came so close to getting it simply to refin and quickly flip - but I resisted. Need that cash for tools and wood.

    I'll be posting soon about:

    Cutting the first Tele body from pine. Hopefully the use of the words "fuzz" and "tearout" will not be used. Or "bleeding" for that matter. This will also cover planers, jointers, routers, and gluing up blanks (not in that order). Lots of potential for mistakes and shenanigans, since I've never done any of that before. You guys joke, but I am seriously worried about my fingers.

    Purchasing and using wood scrapers - several guys on TDPRI rave about them, so after watching a few vids I'm going to give them a shot. It seems a very inexpensive old school way to eliminate much sanding from my life, so it's worth the investigation. Very little chance of self injury there, so - that's good.

    Also, I'm considering letting you guys in on a few finish options I'm considering. I may just keep those under wraps for now.

    Bratt - thread is here:

    http://www.tdpri.com/forum/tele-hom...y-first-bodies-please-guide-me-tele-jedi.html

    - but it's just me asking a bunch of dumb questions of the Tele masters. I'll start new threads for each new build, then link 'em here.

    Voodoo - I answered your PM from the other day.
     
  3. RogerC

    RogerC Well-Known Member

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    Spend a little time watching some safety vids and reading up on safety protocols. If you're not familiar what a piece of equipment, it's worth it to read up. Not only will you be safer, but you'll learn tips and tricks to help you get better results as well. Woodworkers Guild of America has quite a bit of info.
     
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  4. Believer

    Believer Well-Known Member

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    Ooooooh, racing stripes--my '72 Fender Mustang had racing stripes! Want one!
     
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  5. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    Way ahead of you. I've found a page detailing jointer setup, and I downloaded the PDF manual for my planer. I've never used one of those before, and I don't want to be standing in the way if a blade catches. Thanks for the link to the Guild site, it's bookmarked. I may just take a couple days to read through that before I flip the switches on any power tools. It would be anther delay and I really want to get started, but that desire is outweighed by a strong need to retain my phalanges.

    Racing stripes and car themes will likely factor into a lot of my builds. There are quite a few automotive themed guitar finishes out there, but it never seems to get old for me. How cool would that Toronado you described be with an "rs" or "ss" set in a rout and covered in resin?

    camp-1201-03+1967-chevy-camaro+rs-badge.jpg

    ...with the stripe circling the upper and lower bouts thru the back of the body? I think that would be rather nice...

    Today,

    I'll be hitting Home Depot to finally get some cheap and knotty pine to work on some practice bodies. I'll pick up some glue and price/possibly buy:

    Brad point drill bits
    Automatic punch
    Digital caliper

    ...and I still need to order a halfway decent Tele neck to be able to check my build for alignment.

    So much to do...
     
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  6. glasshand

    glasshand Well-Known Member

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    At this point your woodworking skills are probably better than mine, but two tips - don't be afraid of the router; it's apparently one of the safer woodworking tools out there. I'm not saying you couldn't injure yourself with a router, but you'd kind of have to work at it.

    And while I completely understand the desire to save money by practicing on the cheap and knotty pine, keep in mind that good wood actually "works" very differently than the crappy stuff. I was blown away when I started cutting into some mahogany and cherry, at just how nice and easy it was to do stuff with - things that would have resulted in cheap pine or fir splintering and chipping all over the place were now possible, if a little slower because of the denser wood. So maybe get a little of the cheap stuff, and some stuff that's a little better, and experiment to see the differences between the two.
     
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  7. RogerC

    RogerC Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, but I'm going to disagree with you there. Anytime you have a blade spinning at 20,000 RPMs, you've got strong potential for disaster. All it takes is not knowing how to properly rout according to the grain, and you could launch a body blank across the shop. Or have the router grab a knot and jerk one of your hands. And don't forget using the wrong bits for the wrong application. There are plenty of ways to screw things up without having to "work at it".
     
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  8. STACKS

    STACKS Well-Known Member

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    The router is a tool with very bad intentions, a table saw can do enough damage, a full size router is a tool to really pay attention too.

    Don't sell yourself short on your first bodies, if you have good templates, you'll be fine, you've done most of the hard work already.
    Use some decent wood, you'll be glad you did. These are my first bodies, made from templates I made from Ron Kirn's master templates.
    They made very nice Teles
    bodies 015.JPG
     
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  9. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    If I can remember to take it slow and rout "downhill" as much as possible, I should be fine. Only thing I'm worried about there is the bit grabbing and throwing wood across the garage. I have some handles I want to try that are supposed to help prevent horrifyingly gruesome oopsies.

    I couldn't find any pine in a dimension that made any sense to try to piece together a blank from, so I grabbed some cedar instead. I know it's going to be really finicky, but I've seen some people work it into decent instruments. This wood is nothing but sacrificial to get my skills and safety knowledge up and test to make sure my templates aren't crap. I'm most worried about getting everything lined up to center for now. I'll make at least two from the cedar, and go grab some hardwood after that. I should work out any kinks during the first two or three builds. Maybe I'll even get a keeper out of it.

    Cross off the wood glue and digital calipers as well. They only had one pack of brad point bits (3/4 of the sizes were ones I'll never need), and the only automatic punch they had has too big of a diameter to be useful. Those aren't needed immediately, so I'll order the tele neck and scrapers tonight.

    Any suggestions for an accurately made Tele neck as far under $200 as possible?
     
  10. JeffBeck

    JeffBeck Baldy McBaldhead Staff Member

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  11. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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  12. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    They did indeed.
     
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  13. STACKS

    STACKS Well-Known Member

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  14. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    Here's a pic of the sacrificial cedar I grabbed. I should have enough for three body attempts. It's pretty straight, but it's exactly 1.75" thick - so if I plane it, it won't be to proper thickness. I'm considering doing something a little different to compensate for that, should I decide I want to keep one of them.

    20150518_160850[1].jpg
    I have nothing at the house to cut wood at that thickness, I just have to do that the hard way. These boards want to splinter, so the sawing has to be very carefully done. I have to say, I don't think these will survive the router. Again, I'm planning for that likely scenario.

    20150518_161407[1].jpg
    Anyone see a telecaster in there?

    20150519_113634[1].jpg
     
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  15. RogerC

    RogerC Well-Known Member

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    Don't stress about thickness. It's only predicated on the depth of the electronics (mainly the switch), so if you use something with a shorter profile, you won't have any problems. I mainly use a standard 3-way toggle switch, and most of my guitars have come in around 1.5" thick.
     
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  16. cantthink0f0ne

    cantthink0f0ne Well-Known Member

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    I definitely see a tele in there
     
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  17. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    I know thickness isn't a crucial concern normally, but thin guitars just bug me. :)

    I do need to work on learning to use that planer, tho. I'll plane one of the bodies, see how it goes.
     
  18. nomadh

    nomadh Well-Known Member

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    Maybe cruise CL especially for the necks. Refin the more interesting bodies or just sell them off.
    Consider doing a corvete stinger type paint.
    2ede42c63810828911ec2b64c47150f2._.jpg

    The mopar sonic fades were always very cool.
    c2946bf6b43ab43d725030fc7a6c0979._.jpg
     
  19. RogerC

    RogerC Well-Known Member

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    The main issue with planers is controlling snipe. Make sure to adjust your infeed and outfeed beds correctly. It also helps to cut your pieces longer than needed so any snipe will get cut away.
     
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  20. STACKS

    STACKS Well-Known Member

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    If you want a good, cheap, handsaw to have around, the Stanley Sharptooth and FatMax saws are excellent. $10-$20
    They cut really well.
     
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