Best Neck Glue Advice Would Be Great

Discussion in 'Project Depot' started by bc rich, Oct 15, 2019.

  1. bc rich

    bc rich Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    The busted Firefly es 338 is now mine to do what i want as they do not want it returned .
    Part of it is a clean break but most of it has the glue on .
    I am going to give regluing it a shot , as i have clamps but would appreciate any advice as it will be my first and hopefully the last time for this .
    Will i need a glue that will work with the existing glue residue and how much of that glue will i have remove .
    Have been looking at Weldbond 8 , comes in 2 0z pack
    Thanks .
    Pics
    DSCN0474.JPG DSCN0472.JPG
     
  2. idiotsdelight

    idiotsdelight Well-Known Member

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    You want that as clean of any existing glue residue before a fix. You'll be surprised how much you can pick out with an x-acto. Try a heat gun too without the temp set to scald or naphtha might soften it.

    You want wood on wood contact for wood glue. Otherwise epoxy is what I was taught. I'd shoot for Titebond Original. It cleans up easy too.
     
  3. uwmcscott

    uwmcscott AGF Survivor Champ

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    I have no idea but is that a knot in the wood where it broke? Almost looks like they cut the neck out of a piece of wood that still had bark on it
     
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  4. 50 amp fuse

    50 amp fuse Well-Known Member

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    Holly shit! That looks like a knot and or bark! oh well I guess you get what you pay for these days. Could I fix it? Yea. Would I want to seeing its Firefly? No. In any case here's how I'd go about it if I did. First start by removing all that bark or whatever it is and clean up both the neck and cavity ass well as possible. Personally I'd use the West System epoxy because that's what I use and its on hand along with some microbead filler for the voids that bark or whatever the hell it is left behind after I removed it. Pretty messy stuff to work with and takes a bit of skill and practice though. In your case I'd say buy a bottle of Titebond slather it on clamp it up and hope for he best
     
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  5. bc rich

    bc rich Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I had to go take another look , no bark , were the wood broke looks old , i think there was an existing crack in the wood that gave way , not a clean break which makes regluing harder.
    Firefly Restorations R us
     
  6. uwmcscott

    uwmcscott AGF Survivor Champ

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    What the heck is all the dark brown stuff then? The way its broken out in a semi concave fashion looks just like a knot inside the neck block itself.

    I dare you to post these photos over on the main Firefly Fans FB site, it would be a meltdown of epic proportion by the apologists.
     
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  7. Manodano

    Manodano Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I'd try to repair it, but I spy what seems to be the knot right away myself, no eagle eye needed. But is the knot in the neck heel or the body? That makes a mighty weak neck joint, maybe unglue-able and a catastrophic failure. So, if there's enough good wood there, some epoxy might be in order to first fill that knot before trying to glue the neck. It also looks like a lot of glue settled into the pickup cavity - I'd peck that out as well. I think its sort of fluke that that knot was not evident to the "QC" man early on.

    Good learning experience - you got nothing to lose by trying.
     
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  8. bc rich

    bc rich Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I think what looks like a knot is a the surface of a long existing split in the wood
    Luckily i am face book free
     
  9. idiotsdelight

    idiotsdelight Well-Known Member

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    I didn't even look at the image on my phone. That looks like rotten wood to me.

    Yes, please post this on the FB page. It'd be like shaking a beehive.
     
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  10. honyock

    honyock Well-Known Member

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    I don't think that is a knot either.

    If it is a knot, it should be harder than the surrounding wood, The lack of splintering looks more like rot.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
     
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  11. Mikesr1963

    Mikesr1963 Well-Known Member

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    Partner I don't see anything there to glue. What I mean is there is nothing to make a solid bond to or to keep it set so it doesn't dry in a twist.
     
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  12. toomanycats

    toomanycats Well-Known Member

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    If all else fails reattaching with glue, you could always try modifying it to be a bolt on neck. You've got nothing to lose, as it was a free guitar.
     
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  13. backinit

    backinit Well-Known Member

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    That looks like some fiberboard in there. If you can get it to dry fit solidly tite bond might work. Leaning towards an epoxy..good luck.
     
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  14. nomadh

    nomadh Well-Known Member

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    That looks like bark or rot. Sure not solid. I think you would have to at least cut that area out. I think for a decent chance of working would take a seriously skilled luthier. Route out the neck area in the body again. Route out the bad chunk of the neck and glue in a perfect fitting block to make the neck whole again. Then reglue the neck. Crazy to pay someone capable. You need a crazy hobbyist luthier who just wants to see if it can be done for a challenge. Great resume builder for when the guy comes in with the 1930's martin with the shattered neck.
    You could pick out the crap wood, glue the solid part of the neck where it makes contact. Later fill in the void with epoxy.
    I'm talking as a know nothing lookielou. I'd love to hear from an experienced person if I'm even close to right.
     
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  15. Manodano

    Manodano Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I like that bolt-on neck conversion idea.
     
  16. andrewsrea

    andrewsrea Well-Known Member

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    I'd try cleaning the area extensively with Naptha, knocking off the loose wood (rot, knot, bark, something the tree absorbed while growing?), gluing with generous portions of warm Tite Bond Hide glue, fit the neck, pull it off for a few moments, re-attach & clamp, wipe excess with water, let sit for 8 hours before unclamping. Let sit for a week before stringing.

    When gluing you want to fill voids.

    I personally would not use epoxy as you have a lot of void to fill and there will be a lot of squeeze out. That much epoxy is hard to keep from getting messy. And, if you find after using hide glue that there was not enough wood to salvage and you need to go t a bolt-on idea, you can apply steam and heat and pull it right off.

    Tite-bond wood glue will tear and splinter more when trying to remove and epoxy may also, or it may crack and leave pieces in the pocket you'll spend a lot of time removing.
     
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  17. MichaelR

    MichaelR Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I agree totally the more I read about hide glue the more I am convinced it is all I will use on my guitars in most cases. Hide glue pulls the wood together as it drys which would help in your case. It wont be pulled apart by such things as string tension which is one of the reasons it was used for stringed instruments since there beginning. It also drys to a rock hard crystalline form that transfers vibration better than modern plasticized wood glues.
     
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  18. nomadh

    nomadh Well-Known Member

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    No need to kick the beehive on FB. I'm impressed the company responded quickly offered to credit or replace and even left him the old one as a parts guitar/project. But that is the most horrendous piece of neck lumber I've ever seen. Surprised it made it through being strung up.
     
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  19. andrewsrea

    andrewsrea Well-Known Member

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    I use it a lot. Down side: it smells like dead animal, but that quickly fades.

    Case in point, in 2007 I built a 1965 Fender 2x12" Bandmaster cab clone to use with my real 1965 Bandmaster cab. I used hide warm glue to attach the black Tolex. A few months later, I built a Leslie Cabinet and covered it in purple Tolex using 3M 90 Spray Adhesive. The Tolex was from the same manufacturer. The Bandmaster clone is like the day it was made, even though it was giged and been in the rain, heat, cold, etc. The Leslie cab began peeling around 2012.

    I think that hide glue and some non-expanding epoxies with the right amount of hardener are most resonant. I believe the Tite-bond wood glue has more lbs. per square inch holding on wood than hide glue, but does not final cure as hard. Like construction glue, there is a degree of flexibility intended in the TB wood glue design.
     
  20. MichaelR

    MichaelR Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    The current Kit I'm working on used Tite-bond to join the maple cap to the mahogany body which I'm sure is the industry standard these days. I will order my next one from a custom shop or maybe or maybe some one here and will ask for them to be joined them with Hide-glue so I can A-B them for resonance and sustain. I'm betting the Hide-glue will be noticeably better, I believe this is the glue used on the 59 LP's . Read the section here about "glue" to see why I want to use it. https://solodallas.com/the-five-factors-which-create-the-‘1959-burst’-sound
     
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