Best Stage Guitar Amp Ever?

Discussion in 'Amps' started by littlebadboy, Apr 21, 2019.

  1. littlebadboy

    littlebadboy Well-Known Member

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  2. jimytheassassin

    jimytheassassin Well-Known Member

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    Do you want to drive a Tesla or a Shelby Mustang? Ya I see a place for consistency that a digital rig offers. But nothing beats melting faces with a tube amp for me.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
     
  3. eldos1

    eldos1 Well-Known Member

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    Both have midi control and presets. Direct out with multiple cab simulation. The Black Spirit is a new generation solid state that emulates tubes more on a circuit level. You get more control over how the "tube" is emulated in the circuit. The Grand Meister Deluxe 40 uses tubes in the circuit and is also digitally controlled for Midi.

     
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  4. toomanycats

    toomanycats Well-Known Member

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    The best amp I ever played on a stage was a 50 watt Marshall Plexi that had been modified by some unknown tech. It was owned by a rehearsal studio on Staten Island. That amp sounded unreal pushing a 4X12 Marshall cabinet. I often wonder where that amp is now. To this day it remains the"holy grail" of tone and feel, the one I judge any other amp by.
     
  5. 50 amp fuse

    50 amp fuse Well-Known Member

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    Ya know I've been doing this so long now that trying to reinvent myself or sound is pretty pointless. Wouldn't know what to with the new digital stuff even if I did go that direction and to be honest would probably be trying, most likely unsuccessfully, to dial in the sound I already have. But I guess for someone into that type of thing they're supposedly the cats meow. Now excuse me while I go crawl back under my rock.
     
  6. PsychoCid

    PsychoCid Well-Known Member

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    Best stage, maybe Madison square garden
    Best guitar, Frankie
    Best amp, Marshall

    I'd say it's pretty hard to refute these things
     
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  7. tonebender

    tonebender Well-Known Member

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    I thought for sure this thread would have been about a Peavey Delta Blues or C30.
     
  8. manco53

    manco53 Well-Known Member

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    I mean....who really wants another instruction manual in their life or watch a YouTube vid to learn how to do something?

    I just want to rock. How many different tones do you need, truly?
     
  9. littlebadboy

    littlebadboy Well-Known Member

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    I think the author of the article is implying that the traditional stage amps are not necessary anymore. The advent of the "golden age of mfx/modelers" enables us to have a variety of preamp and amp options all in one pedal board. Thus, all we need is a flat response amplification instead of tons of gear as we traditionally do.

    I have not owned tube amps in my 30+ years of amateur playing because I could not afford one. I came from a 3rd world country where money is scarce and still can't afford one even though I live in America now because I have a family to feed. I have been an mfx person since the beginning. Well, I started with an Ibanez Distortion pedal as a beginner... But it was Zoom, Digitech, and then Boss mfx afterwards. With my current Boss GT-100 with all the preamp, cab, and mic'ing sims, I realized that all I need is amplification.

    I am glad that mfx gives me the opportunity to try what certain amp sounds like. They're definitely not the exact, but at least they are close. Why do I need more than one preamp sound? Because I like to play different things. I like the Bogner Uberscahll and the Mesa Dual Rec for chug metal, Blues Breaker for blues, the Soldano gain and cleans for Worship, and so on and so forth. I will certainly not be able to afford to own all those amps!

    I don't gig anymore, and I am currently happy with my mfx to power amp to PA speaker for playing at home. The setup is also capable for gigging if needed.
     
  10. RockYoWorld

    RockYoWorld Well-Known Member

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    It all depends who's the judge. Is it you, the guitar player, on stage? Is it your band members? Is it the fans in the front row where there isn't as good of PA coverage? Or is it 95% of your audience that is in good PA coverage? There are times that I'm jealous of guys that can play a really nice tube amp through a 4x12, but 98% of the time, I'm absolutely content and happy running through my Axe-FX II XL+. It has so many amazing tones in it that I'm not always GASing for a new pedal or amp (so I can focus on guitars! :p ). I very much love my tone coming out of it. I only run 3 main sounds live: cranked Mesa Boogie, clean and funky amp tone for pop stuff, and a Vox AC30 for stuff in between. I also use some ambient patches here and there in addition.

    The low stage volume makes life easy for sound guys. We use in ears so we don't even have stage monitors. That has pro's and con's for feel, but when you're talking about consistency, clarity, and hearing protection, you can't beat it. My mix is almost spot on in my ears every show. I rarely have to worry about it. And I know what my guitar is going to sound out front, whether it's for 50 people or 5,000. I've had nationally touring sound guys compliment my tone and tell me that they love it when they work with the modelers when the patches are built well.

    Now, it should be said that my band either uses the same production company with a high-quality PA system and an experienced sound guy or we're playing venues/festivals with professional rigs/engineers. If you're touring hole-in-the-wall venues for 30 minute sets, I don't know if I would trust that. Granted, I'd probably just use an FRFR cab to ensure stage volume was good because I already have the modeling gear.

    The money I've spent on modelers and in ears could have been spent on an awesome tube amp rig. The price is comparable. There isn't a "right" way to do it. In my opinion, to summarize, going the modeler route is a more "team-player" mentality because the only person missing out from anything is you as the player. Your band-mates will love you, your sound guy will love you, and the majority of the audience will either not notice or be impressed on the clarity and tone.
     
  11. Don Wiklund

    Don Wiklund Well-Known Member

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    It's all opinion of course but I'm fairly certain that the most utilized stage/back line amp in history would be this one.

    846221ad6a44abfbd82aefdc18a6bb8c._.jpg
     
  12. MicahC

    MicahC Well-Known Member

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    This baby The Silver Jubilee dupgob8yzbu95qttgmge.jpg
     
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  13. Manodano

    Manodano Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Top this, sucka:

    b37801925a039cc4908373be19c3dc8a.jpg
     
  14. Beyer160

    Beyer160 Well-Known Member

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    I'd really like to spend some quality time with a Kemper, because I'm a gear nerd and I love to have endless options in the studio.

    As far as a stage amp though, I have to agree with this-

    I need an amp with good clean-ish headroom as a foundation, that I can pound on with a good dirt box and push over a cliff with a fuzz. I sprinkle that with a delay and a few other FX for my own amusement, but the meat and potatoes is an amp with good headroom that sounds good when I push it. My Traynor YBA does that in spades. No, I can't pull a convincing Deluxe Reverb sound out of it and morph into a Mesa Dual Rectifier at the drop of a hat, but I don't need to.

    I'm still in awe of the sounds Hendrix pulled out of a Fuzz Face and a stack of non-MV plexi Marshalls- even without any modern digital gizmos there's a lot of tonal depth to such a simple setup.
     
  15. Chocol8

    Chocol8 Well-Known Member

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    If you always play on the same stage and never have to tear down and setup...and the venue is big enough to crank it, tube amps are still the best.

    In the real world, the article is a absolutely correct. Going to a modeler through FRFR/PA system with low stage volume has way too many advantages for anyone not big enough for a full road crew to ignore.
     
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  16. golem

    golem Well-Known Member

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    I know a one-man band who went with the Helix and some looping pedals. I think it really makes sense.
     
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  17. Partscaster

    Partscaster Well-Known Member

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  18. andrewsrea

    andrewsrea Well-Known Member

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    Once upon a time, yes. I would think it may have been surpassed by the Fender Hot Rod Deluxe. The non-master volume twins are painful on '3.'

    Zappa?

    I haven played out in a few years, but I am hearing a lot that expectations from the venue owners is a quiet band. An IMHO, the gear experience is pretty much for the guitar player vs. anyone else. So, modeling may be the perfect choice for a cover guitarist, convincingly spanning a wide range of music.

    For me when I played covers, it was always variations of my sound. I used a few tube amps to get there and typically around 90dB of stage volume. In smaller clubs I'd face the amp at the back wall and mic the back of the amp (mic phase reversed), so that the audience in front wouldn't get their heads blown off.
     
  19. cornfed

    cornfed Well-Known Member

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    With this does it really forking matter?
    7C1C5774-DBAF-4041-9417-C0A47CC5605E.jpeg
     
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  20. glasshand

    glasshand Well-Known Member

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    I feel like the author is coming from a very specific idea of what "stage performance" means, and I think it really depends on what your situation is. If you're selling out arenas and you have an enormous road crew and budget, I guess you can do whatever you feel like, whether that means going the all-modeling route, or having a pile of Fender Showmans and a whole team of techs, or whatever. On the other end of the spectrum, if you're a small band playing small shows (the situation I suspect a lot of us are closer to), then it's probably simpler to have a combo amp you can just plop down, plug into, and go. If you start asking the bar owner for a full-range flat-response amp and stage monitor, you may just get a blank look and "Whatever is in the closet, man..."
     
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