Calling Our Guitar Builder's!

Discussion in 'Guitars' started by MichaelR, Sep 14, 2019.

  1. MichaelR

    MichaelR Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I just ordered my first guitar kit, its a cheaper one from Amazon at $189 and solid mahogany with a flame maple top. I can't post the amazon link because its to long. I bought a cheap one for the first because of the learning curve especially with stains and such. Anyway Iv'e been wondering why you couldn't use slow drying CA glue instead of Titebond for the neck joint. It seems to me to like the harder the glue the better the wood to wood contact and thus tone and sustain. I know that CA glue dry's hard as a rock with the downside that its permanent and you better get it in right and clamped fast which is why I was thinking of slow dry gel, being careful not to over do it and get it on the body while doing it. Here's a pic of the kit, I thought the flame was interesting and different than most. I'd appreciate anyone's input, I know must use Titebond but I'm thinking CA glue would be really super solid.
    I was also thinking of this one to If i don't like the quality of the Amazon kit because its easy to send back. The BYO kit has a solid maple cap with no flame to sand through. It also has a maple neck and rosewood fingerboard all things that I prefer.
    https://www.byoguitar.com/Guitars/Electric-Guitar-Kit-Standard-Solid-Maple-Top__BYO-LP-M.aspx
     

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    Last edited: Sep 14, 2019
  2. MichaelR

    MichaelR Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Newb builder bump
     
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  3. tonray

    tonray Well-Known Member Supporting Member+

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    Paying a Chinese guy 32 cents to put mine together is more my style...but I am interested
     
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  4. dearlpitts

    dearlpitts Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Cant wait to see the guitar when your done.
     
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  5. dearlpitts

    dearlpitts Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Nice grain on there.
     
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  6. idiotsdelight

    idiotsdelight Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't use CA for a neck joint. Why? It's not getting you a better "connection". You're projecting. I can't even fathom the mess around the joint from dried CA. Titebond is specifically for wood to wood contact.

    God knows I love a good cheap kit. Take a lot of time with it & make it a player. Hopefully.

    Get the neck angle right for starters otherwise you'll have something to hang over the fireplace. Shims/wedges are key for us cheap bastages.

    The finish will be the hardest part. Start reading up on everything you can. You'll be practicing on a lot of scrap woods. Start accumulating some.

    Time to have fun & learn new cusswords.
     
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  7. Fat Jack

    Fat Jack Well-Known Member

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    @idiotsdelight has got it right CA isn't the best choice for that reason . Actully to be obvious what makes a really good neck joint is very tight wood to wood with just enough glue to soak into the fibers and thereby force the wood to break off part of the body or neck rather than slide out. Titebond does this well also it's widely used in wooden boatbuilding.
     
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  8. Milkman

    Milkman Well-Known Member

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    The Titebond will give you the best connection! The body or neck will break before that joint does!

    Good luck with the build, and remember, it’s only wood.
     
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  9. 50 amp fuse

    50 amp fuse Well-Known Member

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    The problem with CA glue is while it has great tensile strength it has very little sheer strength. Kind of why its ideal for gluing down nuts. If you ever need to replace it one tap from the side and it pops right off. If you really wanted to go over the top and not use the Titebond then something along the lines of West Systems marine epoxy would be the ticket. Although not cheap as just the one time use packet kit runs about $20 bucks. I know of a few guitar builders that use it as well as myself. Kind of a bear to work with but I promise you'll never have a joint fail. But then again cant say I've ever seen a Titebond joint fail. Down side is if you ever need to remove anything such as a fret board or neck you cant steam it to make it release. Its on there for good.
     
  10. MichaelR

    MichaelR Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I think Ill go with Titebond III you've convinced me. I hope the neck angle is right because the whole shimming thing arg! It's a cheap one though so I may have to learn how. There are lots of video's on youtube for the finish which really got me interested, I've been watching this one which although its in German just amazes me at the results.

     
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  11. andrewsrea

    andrewsrea Well-Known Member

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    What I used on my glued-in necks. Great set time to get the angle right, dries hard and resonant. Comes apart with steam, if you need to repair.

    e156b48b2650b5d9c6e1a5d73a9d34d9.jpg
     
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  12. MichaelR

    MichaelR Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I know hide glue was the old time glue used my Gibson in the 59 era. Do you have to heat it up to apply it?
     
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  13. andrewsrea

    andrewsrea Well-Known Member

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    You don't have to - but I did with a hairdryer. I thought it helped it spread and settle. The only down side is, it smells like dead horse until it cures.
     
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  14. Texas Slim

    Texas Slim Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Do a dry run assembly before gluing.
    Install the 2 E string tuners, bridge, & tailpiece, then use the strings to align the neck, in addition to checking the neck angle relative to string height. Do this before gluing, and again while gluing, just to be sure everything still lines up nicely.
     
  15. MichaelR

    MichaelR Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Yeah I'm planning on doing a lot of the work on my kitchen table but I'll do the gluing in the shed. Its still warm enough to use the shed in the fall here. I have to get it setup for hanging the guitar when I shoot it with lacquer to. I have a number of things I'll need such as a paint sprayer and a dryer for my air compressor to.
     
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  16. Mickey

    Mickey Gandalf the Intonationer

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    Never forget, if all else fails you can cut two grooves in it and call it an ashtray. :)
     
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  17. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    This, exactly.
     
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  18. idiotsdelight

    idiotsdelight Well-Known Member

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    Yes. #1!

    Get the neck right & you're in business. Take your time & understand the small increments that need to be made. If you need shims keep track of them & their location. It comes with the territory.

    The finish on my Goldtop is prob worth more than the kit. Gibson grain fill, Reranch GT lacquer, & nitro clear because I've always wanted a wear worthy finish. I tire of the thick hard poly finish on everything. The finish will be the hardest thing to nail down.

    I'm confident that the neck angle is as good as I can make it so what's left, the fret work? I can fix that.

    Look through google images for inspiration. Historic Makeovers has an excellent FB page, but i'm sure their stuff can be found online.
    2bc4cb0e707932e53367150cca2d81fa.jpg
    Flame pattern similar to yours, yes? No PG shows off that top too.

    Understand that you bought a $149 kit. There will be flaws, but there's no reason it can't be enjoyable & playable. You'll like it even more because you were responsible for it's creation.
     
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  19. Texas Slim

    Texas Slim Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    My BYO guitar-
    Forgot to mention; everything comes coated in sanding sealer, this must be sanded off neck pocket and neck tenon before glue will hold....
    Exp.1.jpg Exp.2.jpg
     
  20. backinit

    backinit Well-Known Member

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    I will say a things about inexpensive kits..
    1) Be prepared to replace nearly everything including the nut. I think I retained the rear covers and the stop tail from my set neck kits.
    2) Almost all of them can be made to be great players, but may require extensive fret and nut work.
    3) If you don't already have these get them now..a notched straight edge and a fret rocker. No credit card...get a rock or at least a short metal ruler. Stew mac will rape you. Get them from other sources.
    Good luck.
     
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