Fostex Mr-8hd/cd???

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by Powertrip240, Aug 10, 2018.

  1. Powertrip240

    Powertrip240 Well-Known Member

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    I just acquired this Fostex MR-8HD/CD in a trade. It's in like new condition, with the original box. It's an 8 track digital multi-track recorder, with a built-in CD recorder and USB output. It's not something that I was particularly looking for, but it seemed like something that I could flip for a profit. I've had it for about 3 hours now, and I've played with it long enough to see that it's in excellent condition, and is really easy to figure out. Without reading any part of the manual, I was able to plug in my guitar and record and play back a track, with effects added on. It seems like a pretty decent piece of recording gear.

    The reason I originally had no intention on keeping it is because I've been using my tried-and-true Tascam US-1800, plugged into my Apple iMac, using either GarageBand or Reaper for all of my recordings. For what I do, I have no complaints with my current set-up. I bought the Tascam US-1800 about 5 or 6 years ago, brand new, because at that time, I was a drummer. It has 8 XLR inputs, along with 8 more 1/4" inputs. I needed multiple inputs to accept multiple drum mics. I still play drums, but I've switched from acoustic drums to electronic drums, which only require one (or two, if running stereo) inputs.

    My question is this: Does anyone use this type of 8 tack recorder any more? Is it worth trying to flip? Am I going to get anything for it? Or would I be better off keeping the Fostex, and selling my Tascam US-1800? Anyone familiar with one, or both units? Throw your opinions upon me. Pros and cons, etc. Help me decide on which unit to sell.

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  2. toomanycats

    toomanycats Well-Known Member

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    I don't have any experience with the unit in question, though I do own something similar, a BOSS BR-1180CD.

    Having long ago switched over to a Mac based DAW, I will say that there is something very appealing about these little stand alone hard drive equipped multi track recorders. I like the simplicity, the tactile feel of the knobs and faders.

    Perhaps I'm not the only one who feels this way and these things have some degree of desirability.
     
  3. BatUtilityBelt

    BatUtilityBelt Well-Known Member

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    I think the answer will boil down to your own personal work flow. The Fostex is closed-ended (so limited) and self-contained (so extremely portable), and pretty much bug-free. The DAW approach lets you change configuration flexibly and process your music much more, but really wants to be centered at a desk, and can easily get buggy. When a DAW starts acting flakey, it is a pain to diagnose and address - an issue you won't have with the Fostex. I'd put it this way - if the Fostex gives you everything you need to produce music your way without compromise, you'll probably like it better because you'd spend all of your time on the music itself. If you find the Fostex limiting your creativity or end-results, you would probably prefer a DAW.
     

  4. BrianSkeezer

    BrianSkeezer Well-Known Member

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    I have never used a Fostex machine, but I still use a stand-alone, my Zoom R24. I still have my original Tascam 414 Portastudio 4-track tape machine and Tascam DP-01 8-track digital machine too. I also found a Tascam DP-01FX/CD 8-track machine for my son to play with for $30.00.

    My point of all this is that you may not have any luck flipping the units. I prefer the stand-alone units for the portability as mentioned above, but you can also import the WAV files into a DAW for editing at a later time if you want. You could have the stand-alone ready to go so when an idea hits you, you can get it recorded quickly while it's still there, then go back to it later to formulate it more.
     
  5. Powertrip240

    Powertrip240 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies gents! I emailed myself the 150 page User's Manual (so I can print it at work, rather than at home). I'll give it a good run through this weekend and see if it's something that I want to persue. If it can do all that I'm used to doing when it comes to recording (which isn't much), I may just make this my new workstation. I think I can export the project to my Mac for final mixing. I definitely like the compactness and simplicity factor, as opposed to DAW recording. I've had issues in the past with my DAWs being buggy, and freeze up on me. I am just a hobbyist, so I refuse to pay for a DAW when there are decent ones out there for free! So if this little bugger and I can get along, it may make my process even easier.
     

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