Looking For 10-string Scales Resources

Discussion in 'Player's Tips' started by TexSchrute, Feb 13, 2020.

  1. TexSchrute

    TexSchrute New Member

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    New forum member here; I have an Agile Pendulum Pro 102730 10-string - Oceanburst Flame in transit to me, presently, ordered from Kurt at Rondo Music.

    I'd asked him if he had any recommendations for 10-string resources: he recommended this forum, so here I am.

    I have an Ibanez 8-string, but wanted the 10-string, so financed it.

    I'm familiar with Rob Silver's books of scales, but they only cover up through 8-strings.

    Can anyone give me any suggestions?

    I'm pretty certain that the quickest way for me to grow comfortable with this new 10-string monster is practicing scales on it.
    And I enjoy scales.
     
  2. toomanycats

    toomanycats Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    Did Kurt really vouch for us? o_O He obviously has a good sense of humor. :ROFLMAO:

    I have zero experience with ten or even eight string guitars. I do have a seven string, though I've never gotten completely comfortable with that.

    That being said, this may be helpful advice:

    Any guitar tuned to 4ths with have familiar repeating patterns on every pair of adjacent strings. For example, on a six string guitar the notes on the 5th and 7th frets of the Low E and A strings string will be repeated on the 7th and 9th strings of the D and G strings, and again on the 10th and 12th fret of the B and High E strings. We're talking about moving through three octaves of the same pattern.

    Explicitly:

    A B D E* A B D E* A B D E

    ---------------------------10-12
    ---------------------10-12------
    ----------------7-9-------------
    -----------7-9------------------
    ------5-7-----------------------
    -5-7----------------------------

    You can take this concept and easily apply it to a ten string guitar by just extrapolating upon the scale shapes you're already familiar with on a six string. Remember, there's only 12 notes, only some of those notes are used in any scale (excluding the chromatic scale of course), and those notes merely repeat in octaves (and shapes). I hope these ideas help.

    If anybody here has explicit scales they could show you I'm thinking it would be @Narsh.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2020
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  3. Narsh

    Narsh Well-Known Member

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    Welcome!

    Contrary to popular belief I know very little scales.
    I would honestly just start writing and noodling as much as possible.
     

  4. voodoorat

    voodoorat Well-Known Member

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    welcome to the forum, unfortunately we're mostly hopeless 6-stringers and are likely to provide more moral support than useful assistance.
     
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  5. redman

    redman Well-Known Member Supporting Member+

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    This post got me in google mode and there's not much info I could find an a quick search. I can barely play a 6 string and once in a while a 12 string never even tried an extended range guitar. I did however fill in on bass one time for a friend and used his 5 string bass B E A D G by the third song the B string was off and slung in the floor. :D
     
  6. ID10T

    ID10T Well-Known Member

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    Well let me tell you what I would do if I were smart, I'd shut up because you already have input from @toomanycats and @Narsh. But... TMC's wise answer got me to thinking(?) and looking on The Google and extended piano scales came to mind. That's what I would do.
     
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  7. TexSchrute

    TexSchrute New Member

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    Thank's for your responses.
    I've got to give @toomanycats ' comments thought; unfortunately, I've got to start getting ready for work shortly.

    One thing I've done is go to this website, chord.rocks You can plug in parameters & it provides you with chords & scales. Unfortunately, it only goes up to 9-strings.
    So, as the scale's note for E and e are the same, I dropped off the e in customizing the parameters, and entered the 10th string (G#) as the 9th, etc, etc, etc. I then substitute whatever is on the E string, for an additional e string, I tack on top. Messy. But I end up with results. Correct results (I think.)

    I bought some Mac software called GuitarLayers which ought to enable me to create cleaned-up 10-string scales, using the results of the kludge I described above. Once I learn how to use the software.

    But I sure would just prefer to buy a book with what I'm looking for, or grab some stuff off of the Web.
     
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  8. fullonshred

    fullonshred Well-Known Member

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    Welcome Tex. Would love to see pictures and opinion of your new ERG when you get it. And after you sort it out would be interested to hear some recordings or videos of you playing that beast if you are so inclined to post them.

    I cannot add anything wrt 10 string scales. Good luck in your quest!
     
  9. TexSchrute

    TexSchrute New Member

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  10. TexSchrute

    TexSchrute New Member

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    @toomanycats : Thanks for the info you posted, regarding frets 57 79 etc.
    It took me until now to take a look at the fretboard note-layout for an 8-string, and see how what you said extrapolates from a 6-string layout, to the 8-string, and how that will go further to the 10-strings.
    Given what you said, the same set of notes are strings 7 & 8, frets 3 and 5, and they're frets 1 and 3 on strings 9 and 10.
     
  11. TexSchrute

    TexSchrute New Member

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    FYI
    I found two more resources for 10-string scales:

    Fretboard Pro (iOS) $13.99 from Apple App Store.
    It's not as customizeable as the Mac software, GuitarLayers, but will give you all of the most common (and not so common) scales for 6 thru 10 strings. Take screenshots & edit them on other software. Create your own Scale Positions & Shapes. Also offers Chapman Stick & Warr Guitar tunings.

    Visual Scales: Guitar! (Android) $3.99 from Google Play Store [also available through Amazon App Store, but I have not tried that version- sometimes the Amazon App Store offers only older versions of apps, than the Google Play Store]
    Even less customizeable than GuitarLayers, or Fretboard Pro, but will give you many scales for 6 thru 10 strings. Take screenshots & edit them on other software. Create your own Scale Positions & Shapes.
     
  12. Narsh

    Narsh Well-Known Member

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    Hope that works out for you! Its definitely interesting.
    I don't think I would use that at all though. I'm more hands on and would rather spend the time experimenting than referencing software or a book. I don't have the time or focus for that these days.

    But this is coming from a guy who learned pretty much every Metallica, Testament, Maiden and Satriani song note for note using Cherry Lane Books and a cassette deck. :)
     

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