rrobbone's shop thread, updated 11.08

Discussion in 'Project Depot' started by rrobbone, Aug 11, 2009.

  1. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    Hey Gary, thanks for the links. I was looking at those as they are the closest I could find to what I'd need to do. However, I would have no idea as to how to add the killswitch into the circuit.

    I was thinking that the BFG wiring mod would be killer in an STL. A blue one.

    Oooooo, bluuuuuuuuuue.....

    [​IMG]


    [Edited on 13-8-2009 by rrobbone]
     
  2. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    Have we met?

    ;)
     
  3. midnightblu

    midnightblu Well-Known Member

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    I could not have said it better.
    Nice work rrobbone. :bigthumb:
     

  4. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    "I have not failed. I have just found 10,000 ways that won't work." - Thomas Edison

    Update time. I have been ignoring a perfectly good STL rewiring job that I have all the parts for so I can work on the Dean V. My STL hangs on the wall, it's guts and wires hanging out as though it had been the latest victim in the next installment of an 'Alien' movie. I may just wait on that until a day that something is drying on both the V and the Washburn.

    Speaking of the Washburn, I'm still waffling on a design direction for it. I'm thinking it needs lime green right now. Why not, the eighties are in style again, right? ....Right?

    I have a definite plan for the Dean now, but for the small details. I think you guys are gonna like it.

    Here's the Dean again, sanded down through the sealer (but not all the way) with 60 grit down to 220:

    [​IMG]

    I don't know if you can get a good feel for the color, but it reminds me of a bowling alley. And here's the backside:

    [​IMG]

    So much prettier. If I ever decided to refinish my explorer, this is the shade I'd go for with a tobacco/black bursted edge.

    The way it's looking now would make for an interesting finish, don't you think?

    [​IMG]

    I am not sanding through the sealer to bare wood because I have a much better idea of how my sealer and paint layers will behave with different surfaces. I'll be going with a modified version of a cloth covering like on the Washburn, so on the front and back I'll just need a rough surface for the glue to adhere to. I know (through hours of sanding the Washburn) that I'll want to leave some room for error, and I think leaving some sealer on the body will give me a cushion if (God help me) I ever have to sand the cloth off again. This shot gives you a comparison between the sanded part and where I started:

    [​IMG]

    The seal coat is rather thick, so it's been pretty easy not to sand through. Then again, I *am* using 60 grit:

    [​IMG]
     
  5. yesca

    yesca New Member

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    Ahh dude...c'mon man, I'm at work. If my boss sees spread legs....
     

    Attached Files:

  6. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    This is the main reason that I couldn't keep the braziliaburst finish:

    [​IMG]

    That nick on the side is pretty harsh. I couldn't drop fill it properly. Ain't gots da skeels. Besides, I bought it to completely rework anyway. So there.

    Like I said, it's in really good shape for being a pointy guitar hung in a pawn shop for half a year. This is the worst of the damage on any pointy end:

    [​IMG]

    Not a tough fix at all. So all of my sanding prep for the body is done at this point. TIme to clean out the holes so crap doesn't build up too much in them. I just use a drillbit in my hand to do this. Not a big deal now, but I'll need to be diligent about it when I start slathering on the sealer.

    [​IMG]

    Now I need to get to filling those string thru holes. Went to home depot for some dowels, and they were out of the smaller size I needed. I'll have to improvise. Wait, what? You're saying I should wait until I can get the proper size dowel?

    Nah, I'm far too impatient for that. Besides, I'll get to show you a cool wooden hole filling trick. First I make a template of the correct hole positioning on the front and back. I don't think I'll need this since I have the pointy metal string through piece (which is it's technical name, I'm sure of it). One never knows. C.Y.A. early and often. A nice pencil rubbing will do the trick:

    [​IMG]




    [Edited on 17-8-2009 by rrobbone]
     
  7. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    So I take the dowel, which is slightly bigger than the hole I'll fill, and rub it on some coarse grit sandpaper to narrow the tip and some of the shaft and form a conical shape:

    [​IMG]

    When it is small enough to penetrate about half an inch, I mark a line in pencil, this does not have to be exact at all. It's just a guide:

    [​IMG]

    I simply cut the narrowed end off the dowel and start again with the next hole. I repeat until I have six conical plugs, and grab the cyanoacrylate, a.k.a. superglue.

    [​IMG]

    I grabbed the two-pack because this method uses a bunch. Also, all the time I was sanding the dowel, I was saving the wood shavings for later steps. Apply some CA to the plug and very carefully to the inside of the hole and pop it in. Have an old rag handy to catch the spillover as you push the plug into the body. I don't really have to mention that I would never do this to a body that I wasn't going to completely refinish, do I?

    [​IMG]

    And repeat until...

    [​IMG]

    At this point, the plugs are still sticking out about a 1/8" so after they dry a bit, whip out the palm sander with some medium grit and go to town. Mine still had 220 on it, so that's what I went with. Doesn't take long to get them flush.

    When the halos around the plugs are gone, you've sanded them flush.

    [​IMG]

    Done!

    [​IMG]

    On to the front...
     
  8. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    This step deals with a bunch of glue that dries fairly quickly, so I don't have pics of everything. I had to work fast and had no time for pics during some steps!

    Basically, what I did was drop a big glop of CA into the holes on the front and spread it all around the inside with toothpick. Then I took a few pinches of the sawdust and stuck it in the hole, mixing it in with the toothpick. THen I stuffed the hole full of toothpicks, adding glue and sawdust as needed.

    [​IMG]

    What I'm trying to accomplish is to make the filler in the hole as dense as possible because I may have to drill through it and set screws in it later when I make the string holes and remount the string guide. I'm pretty sure that I won't have to drill through the old holes, but I want what I drill through to be as solid as possible one way or the other.

    Some people will mix the CA and sawdust in a container beforehand. Either way will work. And either way, it's good to know that you can rub cooking oil on your hands and roll CA off of the ends of your fingers when you inevitably glue some sawdust (or a toothpick, etc.) to yourself.

    Break off the toothpick ends, and sand it back down. I do this right away because the sawdust will fall into the holes, mix with the CA and set. Then I reach for the woodfiller, wash my hands and wait to sand it back down tomorrow.

    After that will be to plot and drill the new string holes. The bridge post holes are crooked as well, but it's not a biggie so that's not a headache I'm going to give myself.
     
  9. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    I've got a pretty good idea about the design for the Dean. I'll be using this as inspiration:

    [​IMG]

    This is an insignia and logo from a WWII bomber that my Lady's grandfather flew through quite a few missions. He flew this plane as it was shot down, recovered, repaired, reinstated, and shot down again over Nazi Germany. Both times, he saved the lives of his crew.

    Upon being shot down the second time, her Grandpa guided the plane in, holding it in position long enough for the surviving crew to bail out before bailing himself. He was a POW of the Nazis for almost a year. Her grandmother recieved word from the gov't that he was dead. He survived, and the rest is history.

    I've seen the correspondence, paperwork and such (including hand signed letters from president Roosevelt and Truman, and his POW release papers), and it's quite interesting. It is a very humbling feeling to hold a genuine document from Nazi Germany. You've seen the wartime footage on History channel, but nothing can nail it down and make it real for you quite like that can.

    In any case, I think it fitting to put the logo on a flying V.
     
  10. Perfect Stranger

    Perfect Stranger Well-Known Member

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    just leaving your mama's bedroom!
    Now that's cool! :bigthumb:
     
  11. GypsyHook

    GypsyHook New Member

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    Excellent thread and narrative. I find the "nose" art really interesting, very futuristic for the time frame. Do you know if it came off a B-25 Mitchell? Regardless ,it is a nice way to utilize the design . :cool:
     
  12. ultralight23k

    ultralight23k New Member

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    very intresting thread, can't wait to see the outcome.

    though, i'd have to say that brazilian finish looks kinda like a kitchen laminate countertop.

    cool story on the insignia, it'll look sweet on the dean.
     
  13. foilcurtain

    foilcurtain Active Member

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    that insignia will look nice on the dean. nice story behind it!:bigthumb:
     
  14. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    Darn you Gypsy! You got me all up in arms wondering about that plane and what it looked like! I got lost in it and have stayed up past my bedtime again!

    I've done some research and I have far more info than I'm going to type out at 3am, BUT...

    I will tell you that the Reluctant Dragon was a B-17 Flying Fortress based in Snetterton Heath, England. It flew 12 missions and was downed twice.

    There is a B-17 at a museum at Dyess AFB that is at the very least painted with the markings of the Dragon. I'm not sure if it's the 'real' Dragon, though. Apparently, the AF shuffles these planes around every once in a while and they get new paint that doesn't necessarily match the plane they really are. I have feelers on several forums and if it's the real thing, I wanna go see it now that I know some of the history behind it.

    I am kinda concerned in light of new info that the insignia might not actually be the nose art for the plane. I'll probably use it anyway, unless I can dig up an old photo of the Dragon's art. Confusing the issue is that there were at least 4 planes with that name, and two of those were B-17's in the 96th BG.

    In any case, I've got some cool pics of the Reluctant Dragon and a few other historical items of note if you guys are interested.
     
  15. GypsyHook

    GypsyHook New Member

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    Sorry! I didn't want you to stay up. It is cool that you have recycled such stylized nose art into something that will be unique and modern. I was in helicopters in 'Nam and even we had nose art. There are books on the topic and cover WWII aircraft
    (there is even books on 'Nam era nose art) What I find especially interesting is that the "Reluctant Dragon" name and art work were not the pin-up babe or war slogans that were standard. Unique project my friend :bigthumb:

    [Edited on 19-8-2009 by GypsyHook]
     
  16. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    I have been told that the art I have was the insignia of the 339th Bomb Squadron, 96th Bomb Group, 8th AF. The more I researched, the more evident it became that this was not painted on the plane itself as nose art. So you were right, it didn't fit in with the style used at the time.

    Good eye, my friend!

    Some of the info posted overnight includes a frontal shot of what may be the particular 'Dragon' I'm looking for, and you're right about it being very different from what was used at the time. I just need to verify that the plane in the pic is the one my Lady's grandfather flew, among other details about the story so I can incorporate them into the design.

    For example, I know that the Dragon flew at least 12 missions, so I'll put 12 of the little bomb logos that were used to indicate how many missions each plane flew.

    BTW, I know you guys weren't exactly standing around snapping photos, but if you have any shots of your heli's artwork handy I'd love to see 'em. I have become fascinated by it.
     
  17. Rick In Pa.

    Rick In Pa. Well-Known Member

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    I just have to say Rob, regardless of how this guitar turns out (which I'm sure will be awesome) this is just such a cool project for you to undertake. I thik you are going to find that you are going to get much more than an awesome guitar out of this. Not to mention, it will probably mean a ton to your girl and her family that you are doing this. Cheers buddy, nice job!
     
  18. GypsyHook

    GypsyHook New Member

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    here is a link that might be of interest to you,

    http://www.vhpamuseum.org/art/art.shtml

    :bigthumb:
     
  19. rrobbone

    rrobbone Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Gypsy, that is a cool site. Anyone who needs inspiration for what to paint on a guitar need only to click there.

    Here's a rundown of what I've been able to find so far, it's quite different from what the families knew about the missions:

    My Lady's gramps, Jerry was his name, was given the assignment to pilot the Reluctant Dragon in March of 1944. It was a brand new B-17. They flew several missions without major incident. On May 8, 1944 they were diverted from a bombing run on Berlin to make a run on Brunswick. En route, the squadron of 14 B-17 bombers was attacked by somewhere in the neighborhood of 30 German fighter planes. A pair of Messerschmitts came up on the left side of the Dragon for a strafing run. The gunner engineer, a man who went by the name of Pete, hit one of the Germans in the left wing from the top turret - splitting the wing and downing the fighter. But the other fighter scored hits on the Dragon, shearing it's left stabilizer with 20mm cannon shells and killing Robert, another gunner aboard. The Dragon started to fall from the sky. Six airmen baled out over Germany and were taken as POWs. The three that remained: Jerry, Pete, and the bombardier, John stayed on board to try to save the plane. The warship fell 10,000 ft at around 400mph, but the three men leveled her out. Pete had jumped into the co-pilot seat to help steady the controls while John acted as navagator. The three airmen returned the badly damaged Reluctant Dragon back to its base at Snettington Heath, England and made a perfect landing.

    Four days later, Jerry was flying a different B-17 when it was shot down in Czech airspace. It crash landed in Germany with two dead. Eight became POWs. Jerry survived with a severely injured right hand and was a POW for 8-9 months. He was repatriated somewhere around the following January. He passed away of natural causes in 1973. I never met the man.

    The two men who stayed at his side to save the Dragon went on bombing runs on May 27, 1944 in two separate bombers.

    John was serving as bombardier aboard a B-17 that maneuvered to avoid flak and struck another bomber, sending both planes to the ground. Four airmen out of the ten on board survived the collision, John was not one of them.

    Pete was also top turret aboard a B-17 that also collided with another bomber while avoiding flak. There were no survivors.

    Both men died in midair collisions while avoiding flak in two separate incidents on the same day.

    In the paperwork I have, there are several handwritten messages that imply that the family of John does not have all of the info that I do. I'll be attepmting to contact them soon.

    I found out that the B-17 in Abilene is unfortunately NOT the Dragon, only painted to look like it. It seems that my Lady's gramps wasn't the only pilot the Reluctant Dragon had, but he was the only one to save her. With a different crew aboard, she was shot down 25km east of Aachen, Germany. She held together long enough to save the remaining 6 of her 10 man crew on crash landing. She was a tough old bird.

    Since the running standard in this forum is "pics or it didn't happen," here is a shot or two of the three men who saved the Dragon inspecting her shorn stabilizer on May 8, 1944:

    [​IMG]

    The bottom picture shows from left: John, Pete, and Jerry.

    This is the Reluctant Dragon herself with her final crew, presumably mere hours before she was lost:

    [​IMG]

    It truly is astounding what one can find on the internet.





    [Edited on 20-8-2009 by rrobbone]
     
  20. foilcurtain

    foilcurtain Active Member

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    wow. you did some MAJOR digging up, huh?
     

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