Sunday Morning Blues Jam W/clapton & Dcw Overdrive Pedal (videos)

Discussion in 'Gear Reviews' started by toomanycats, Feb 3, 2019.

  1. Chocol8

    Chocol8 Well-Known Member

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    No, Northfield Music in the village of Pittsford. They are on their third location that I remember but all within about 50 feet of each other.

    https://www.northfieldmusic.com/

    I never bought any gear at the HoG, just a lot of tapes, CD’s, and a few shirts. I am sure they carry Epiphones though.
     
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  2. tlarson58

    tlarson58 Well-Known Member

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    I 'm a sucker for that "rake" bend. Its one of the few things that I can pull off consistently.

    Nice chops. Taking a the tab and throwing in a dash of yourself is a nice way to go about learning a solo, I think.
     
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  3. toomanycats

    toomanycats Well-Known Member

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    Hey thanks man. Gotta love the rake bend. My favorite of all time is this one Jeff Beck does near the beginning of "Goodbye Pork Pie Hat." It's a slow rake, but soooo effective.

    I actually didn't learn "Worried Life Blues" from tab. I've got nothing against tab, and I have used it plenty. But I figured this one out by ear, on purpose mind you, for reasons explained below. Any "dash of myself" you're hearing is likely where I transcribed it less than accurately.

    Learning by ear is the best ear training exercise. You must listen extremely closely, familiarizing yourself with the sound of intervals, the difference between notes played as bends or slides, the way a tone sounds different played on the B string vs higher up on the G string, just all kinds of minutia.

    There is also so much subtle stuff going on with playing like this that cannot be translated via tab. In order to really get the piece you have to listen to how Clapton slurs, mutes, subtly pauses and hesitates, allows the meat of his thumb to soften a note, deftly switches between fingers and pick, and so on.

    It's like the difference between solving a mathematical problem with pencil and paper contrasted with using a calculator. The former imparts a deeper understanding.

    When you think about it, all the great English "blues scholars" (Page, Clapton, Beck, etc) must have learned like this, listening closely to records over and over, trying to cop a musical phrase exactly as they heard it, including the notes, tone, emotion, pacing, all of it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2019
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  4. Chocol8

    Chocol8 Well-Known Member

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    To make it harder, they were able to slow down the record player, but pitch changed with speed. Add in no videos, no guitar teacher who knew shit, and no way to see the blues masters in person from 4000 miles away. It took a lot of listening and playing for a Brit to learn blues in the early to mid 60’s.
     
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  5. toomanycats

    toomanycats Well-Known Member

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    Exactly. It's only natural that these guys would seek each other out, sharing "secrets" amongst themselves that must have seemed like magic or alchemy. So much was cloaked in mystery back then.

    I remember hearing a story, involving Beck I think, where somebody sneaked into a dressing room to peak at a guitar and realized it didn't have a wound G string. Then a little later on there's EVH playing with his back to the audience so people could't see what he was doing with his right hand.
     
  6. Chocol8

    Chocol8 Well-Known Member

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    My understanding is a lot of the London area guys would use strings 4-6 as is, move the B to G and E to B and then either get a second high E string (.11 or .12) or get a bango .09 or .10 to use for the high E. Beck, Clapton, and Page were all likely doing it in the Yardbirds years of not before, as was Pete Townsend.

    In the US, I think there were country guys even earlier who would toss the 6th string, shift the other 5 down one and get a bango .09 for the high E. @Mickey may know more.

    Luckily by time I can along, you could just buy .09’s and .10’s with unwound G strings.
     
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  7. Narsh

    Narsh Well-Known Member

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    I was about to comment on the vibrato you were using. Seemed out of place but I checked out how Eric plays it and man its spot on. You totally captured all the little nuances. Great job.
     
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  8. toomanycats

    toomanycats Well-Known Member

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    Thanks man. Over the years that type of fast vibrato has become part of my personal style, so it comes pretty natural to me when I need to execute it.

    As I've only been delving deeply into Clapton for about year I can't solely attribute it to his influence. There are other guys I've previously studied who use a similar fast vibrato, such as BB King, Johnny Winter, Michael Bloomfield, Gary Moore, and Angus, amongst others. There's something emotionally heightened about a fast vibrato, conveying spastic but controlled energy, a vibrancy.

    That being said, sometimes you've just got to "milk" that note slowly. Just imagine that creamy middle solo for G&R's "November Rain" played with a fast vibrato, instead of that slow pulsating vibrato that Slash uses. Yuck! :tongueclosed:
     
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  9. Jaymo

    Jaymo Well-Known Member

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    That Woodsman pedal is pure sex.
     
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