Thank You For Your Service And My Freedom

Discussion in 'What's left to Talk About?' started by andrewsrea, May 23, 2020 at 9:56 AM.

  1. andrewsrea

    andrewsrea Well-Known Member

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    Saw this and thought it was powerful. Thank you to everyone who has served and paid the ultimate price for everyone in the USA's freedoms.

    Memorial Day.jpg
     
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  2. andrewsrea

    andrewsrea Well-Known Member

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    Gratitude bump.
     
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  3. AnotherJim

    AnotherJim Well-Known Member

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  4. Mickey

    Mickey Gandalf the Intonationer

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    I must say, I have long been offended by this type crap.
    Back when I was in (Vietnam War) the draft gave us no choice, none of us wanted to be there.
    But our choice was go to prison or go in the military.
    When I got back to the States, people would spit on you if they knew where you had been.
    Decades later all this mushy "Thank you for your service." crap started.
    The people who ought to be thanked name's are on a memorial in Washington D.C.
    But I dunno how you can thank them.

    /soapbox mode off
     
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  5. fullonshred

    fullonshred Well-Known Member

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    I am sorry anyone spit on you or screamed at you. You certainly did not deserve that.

    I would never ever have spit on you or put you down even had your service been by choice. Had we been able to poll the entire country I suspect those spewing venom toward the returning servicemen would have been found to be a minority, very loud and overly represented by the media.

    My father served twice, by choice both times. Volunteered during WW2 and then again during the korean war. He did not see active duty but did not avoid it either. Then after he retired he offered to work for the military for free in any capacity they saw fit. They thanked him but rejected his offer.

    Many other older men who have been important in my life also served, several by the volunteer route. One, my sponsor, volunteered during WW2 and saw serious action in the pacific. He would never talk about it in depth. Had he come along later he likely would have been diagnosed with PTSD.

    imo, just because some people were assholes towards military personnel back then (and even now) doesn't mean the rest of us shouldn't be kinder and more appreciative now.
     
  6. andrewsrea

    andrewsrea Well-Known Member

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    I honestly appreciate what you did, Mickey. Even more so if you went because they made you.

    Watched my cousins, family friends and neighbors go to Vietnam. I watched them come back in boxes and often mental pieces. My Dad's billiard buddie, Woody, spent almost 4 years in a bamboo cage 3' high x 3 wide x 7' long and worked their rice fields for 12 hours a day. He is the same height as my Dad (6'2") and when rescued, weighed less than 120 lbs (I'd say he is 150 now - still skinny). You wouldn't know it to talk with him now and I am amazed how much he has his shit together.

    My nephew did 2 tours in Afghanistan and Iraq, doing bad-guy extractions door to door in 115 degree heat in full body armor. Saved his buddies life after their Humvee ran over an IED. Suffered 3rd degree burns and received the Bronze star, a Purple heart and a medical discharge. A week later while he and his buddie were in a burn unit in Germany, his platoon was guarding Bagdad airport and a car bomber got all of them. My nephew hasn't fully made it back is currently self-medicating.

    I also am getting ready to shut down a 35 year career in defense. I met a ton of folks who tell me how many enemies around the world are looking for the opportunity to get in to the US and take it away.

    In the US, we get to say pretty much what we want. An except for a couple of thin weeks at college, I've never gone hungry. I know the life I have is not perfect, but I believe it is comparatively great.

    If you hear thank you from me for service - it is sincere.
     
  7. devdem

    devdem Well-Known Member

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    Mickey I'm glad you said that. I have always felt weird about the programmatic nature of the "thank you for your service" mantra, since I first started hearing it. I don't doubt sincerity, but it has become a "line" in many respects and I've been concerned how it lands on the ears of vets.

    I never served in any type of military or first responder capacity. Grew up in peace time in suburban comfort. Went to college, got a job, and 5 decades later, I'm living a life many people in the world wish they could have. That said, I've always felt like I need to do my part somehow, not just letting my tax money cover for me. So the best way I figure I manifest my thanks and appreciation for military and emergency service vets was to figure out ways to help fill gaps in medical and other family and counseling needs our vets and their families may require for damages they've incurred in the line of duty.

    Anyway, you touched on something that I've felt odd with in my own way and I'm glad you expressed it from another perspective. I know enough vets and first responders to hear how they've frequently had to do and experience things you never agreed to, and take a lot of crap. So - I may not verbally express it so clearly, but I'm soberly grateful - and I hope I can do what I see as my part as a citizen to provide what is needed to support our vets.
     
  8. Mickey

    Mickey Gandalf the Intonationer

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    Just thinking, got to admit I did know one guy who wanted to go to Nam, my cousin.
    All he could talk about during his senior year in high school was joining the Marines, going to Nam & killing gooks.
    As it happened he joined the Marines, volunteered for Nam & when he arrived he tripped coming down the stairs getting off the plane.
    By the time he got to the bottom, he had a compound fracture of one of his legs.
    He was med-evaced back stateside.
    Once he healed, he spent the remainder of his hitch in a "Toy Soldier Uniform" guarding the U.S. Embassy in Greece. :)
    I believe he did get a Purple Heart out of it.
     
  9. dspellman

    dspellman Well-Known Member

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    There are times when I look at these "Thank you to everyone who has served and paid the ultimate price for everyone in the USA's freedoms" ads and wonder why there aren't memes that read, "Your dad helped military-industrial folks earn billions during VietNam" and "Your dad helped kill hundreds of thousands of people just like you, but in their country and for no good reason." Or "Your dad helped Halliburton steal oil contracts from German and French companies so that Halliburton could open a new headquarters in Dubai," or "Your dad died so that we could extend wars where no one wins, no one wants us and no one cares, except that we leave."

    The people who should be thanking us for our service are the old fat guys who ride to their golf appointments and their yacht consultations in private jets and limos with their blond of the month and who would be annoyed at getting some of the blood sprayed on their suits by a dying buddy (mine, not his) missing parts that he needed to live. We weren't there for "USA's freedoms."

    I have medals, some metal in my butt and some memories I just can't shake that make me just a little sick when someone says, "Thank you for your service."
     
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  10. golem

    golem Well-Known Member

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    I take some time on Memorial day to remember those who have served and lost their lives. I know some of my ancestors sacrificed their lives believing they were protecting freedom and democracy. If nothing I else, I remember and pay my respects to them. I also try to remind myself that every time we go to war, it comes at a heavy cost and that it is never something we should take lightly.
     
  11. Manodano

    Manodano Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    The last draft call for Viet Nam came when I was sixteen, but as a kid I agonized about going, from the time
    I grew to realize what "the draft" really was, until the time the draft was over. I knew I didn't want to go fight such a senseless war in that godforsaken jungle, that's for damn sure. And I was pretty sure that I did not have what it took to survive. I still believe that today. I really doubt I would have made it back. I was blessed to have been born when I was.

    As a 13 year old I knew an 18 year old with a low draft number that shot himself point blank in the eyeball with a BB pistol to dodge the draft. No fucking kidding. That kid was scared.

    I was born in 1956, and if you are just a few years younger than me. you probably can't fathom Mickey's post. It was a hell of a dark time. Our cohort looks at the flag a little differently than those before or after us.

    But the younger vets you encounter these days volunteered for the military, and I always respectfully say "Thank you for your service to our country" to anyone that's served, and I mean it. I also understand that it gets taken different ways by different people. Sometimes its sort of brushed off, other times it results in an engaging conversation.

    We don't do enough for those that have served, on any level.

    Musing over this, I think from now on, I will say to all that have served: "Please accept my thanks for your service to our country".
     
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  12. nomadh

    nomadh Well-Known Member

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    A lot of this is over compensation for the treatment of the name vets. But overall it's a good thing. I have wondered how it was some hippie back then spits on a combat marine and he doesn't have the front of his nose though the back of his head before he hits the ground. And any witnesses just keep on walking. Especially a marine that didnt want to be there in the first place.
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2020 at 2:01 PM
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  13. stevebway

    stevebway Metaphysician & Ham

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    Read through this entire positing .Moving and timely
     
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