What Was Your Favorite? (hint: Tapes. Caution: Brain Shaker!)

Discussion in 'What's left to Talk About?' started by sabasgr68, Sep 10, 2019.

?

What was your favorite?

Poll closed Sep 20, 2019.
  1. TDK

    57.1%
  2. BASF

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. SONY

    14.3%
  4. MAXELL

    52.4%
  5. PIONEER

    4.8%
  6. HITACHI

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. NONE

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. sabasgr68

    sabasgr68 Well-Known Member

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    You can choose more than one.

    I was very proud of my bag of tapes... :cry2:

    TDK and Pioneer for me! (although I used others, of course).

    Tapes.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2019
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  2. toomanycats

    toomanycats Well-Known Member

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    Just looking at those cassettes brings back lots of memories. Difficult to say which was my favorite and I had no particular brand loyalty back in the day. I basically used whatever was cheap and I could get my hands on.

    The black and gold Maxell reminds me of Prince's 1999 I had dubbed onto one just like that.

    If memory serves correctly, I used a brand called Avanti to "bootleg" The Empire Strikes Back with my General Electric model number 3-510shoebox cassette recorder. That was in the Spring of 1980, at the matinee of a small movie theater in then three year old Joe Bonamassa's home town.

    Damn, I wish I had a time machine.
     
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  3. sabasgr68

    sabasgr68 Well-Known Member

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    Nice memories...

    Oh boy, what would I do, and what I wouldn´t, if I could go back...
     
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  4. backinit

    backinit Well-Known Member

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    Maxell Chromium Dioxide for me. I recently found my old Pioneer Dual tape deck. I don't know what to do with it...lol
     
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  5. Buddy

    Buddy Well-Known Member

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    A childhood friend and I used to do a lot with cassettes. We had a little “radio show,” if a couple of 10 or 12 year olds could call it that.

    We used to try for Sony, but when we couldn’t get those we went with TDK.

    I did a whole song using 2 boom boxes, 2 tapes and my voice. Recording a “drum beat,” then playing it back and recording on the other boom box while doing a bass line over the drum beat, ping ponging back and forth. It had degenerated so badly by about the 4th recording eound it was barely audible, but it got a good response from my friends. I did that between customers while working at a gas station in high school.
     
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  6. sabasgr68

    sabasgr68 Well-Known Member

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    Haha some things are better left unfound... You got a problem :)
     
  7. sabasgr68

    sabasgr68 Well-Known Member

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    Child creativeness is great!

    We could do so many things with those cassettes...
     
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  8. sabasgr68

    sabasgr68 Well-Known Member

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    This has got me thinking for a while...

    Why would you want to "bootleg" the audio of The Empire Strikes Back? To hear it again and again, as if you were watching the movie "again" and remembering the great parts?

    (who of us hasn´t done crazy things back in the day?)
     
  9. uwmcscott

    uwmcscott AGF Survivor Champ

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    TDK SA series was my go-to. I still have a old-school Harmon/Kardon deck that i use for the occasional digitization of one-off recordings. I use the HK deck and audacity.
     
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  10. DonM

    DonM Well-Known Member Supporting Member+ Supporting Member

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    I was primarily a TDK and Maxell guy. Man, I thought the cassette tape and recorder was one of the greatest inventions ever. Make mixed tapes and copies of favorite albums and then you could play them in the car and then play them at parties and protect your albums and stereo needle from the wannabe DJ drunks.
     
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  11. toomanycats

    toomanycats Well-Known Member

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    When I was just a kid in the 70s cassette culture was in full swing. I used to record sounds, people, television shows, records, the radio. The ability to capture any sound was a magical thing to me. I still have dozens of aging cassettes containing various sounds from the world of my youth. This fascination with capturing and preserving the temporal-auditory aspects of experience remains with me to this day.

    Specifically regarding my recording The Empire Strikes Back in the movie theater, let me ask you this: Are you old enough to remember a time before everything was available for instant recall, back when seeing a film was a singular ephemeral event? This mode of experiencing is now almost totally lost to us. Back then a film or live musical performance had weight, intense meaning, and significance. It was a precious experience that could only to be savored in the moment. You couldn't go home and watch it again on YouTube, or Netflix, or on your smartphone, or whatever. When something that was a singular magical event was in fact captured, it was an amazing thing. Grateful Dead concerts bootlegged on cassette, the Woodstock film, and The Allman Brothers album At Fillmore East were all special moments captured on tape, film, and vinyl respectively.

    When I was eleven years old and my Mother took my siblings and I to see The Empire Strikes Back it had that same kind of power of a magic and unrepeatable performance. Not because one couldn’t go to the theater again and watch it numerous times, as no doubt many people did, but because I couldn’t watch it again and again. There were images of the film all over the media, on television, in marketing, in advertising, in toys, and all manner of products, all designed to capture the "magic" and allow a fan to bring it home. But the experience of watching the film itself was unobtainable to me. The memory of it was remote and fleeting, floating somewhere in the empyrean of my imagination. By recording the audio I was trying to get as close as possible to the film itself, to preserve it and bring it home with me. It is well known how powerfully the music of John Williams evokes the feeling of the film, with its numerous Wagnerian style leitmotifs each representing a character or scene. When my friends and I listened to the music, dialogue, and sound effects of The Empire Strikes Back in the elementary school cafeteria it was an intense re-experiencing of the film.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2019
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  12. sabasgr68

    sabasgr68 Well-Known Member

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    HK is quality stuff! Great that you still use it!
     
  13. sabasgr68

    sabasgr68 Well-Known Member

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    Totally agree! I had lots of mixed cassettes of my favorite music, different styles, I would even made one specially for a specific car trip -yes, this was centuries ago, when we were wild and young and free :)- .

    Then, I believe it was in the end of the 90s, I started making mixed CDR with the music I like, just the same as with cassettes. I had lots of cdrs too -my own Journey Greatest Hits cdr, Bon Jovi, Pink Floyd, Disco, etc...-.

    Great times.
     
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  14. nomadh

    nomadh Well-Known Member

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    At 55 I'm the oddball once again. I was an 8track guy. A carryover from my dad and a lot of his great music. I've always been old. Saved money like my depression era grandparents. Listened to my dad's music. Hung out w my dad's friends. Just jammed with a dad friend I ran across from cl playing music. He knew me when I was 5.
    So I was the only 8track guy in hs. I did briefly cross over to cassette to have music for Walkman jogging but only when everyone was well into cd. I only switched to cd to be one of the very first cutting edge mp3 people. As mp3 grew popular and people had 32k or even 128k of mp3 I had portable 700k mp3 cd. That stayed until the 80 gig ipod.
    That was a weird history of my audio prefs?
    Anyway those 8tracks really defined my early guitar learning. No back up and repeat for me. I got a chance at learning something once every 10 min as it went by. I got good at learing to play something compatible, in harmony and in key. Not particularly correct. As far as tapes I think I used a lot of realistic by RadioShack, kmart, gemco and twoguys store brands.
    I could rarely afford tdk or maxell in 8track or cassette.
     
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  15. sabasgr68

    sabasgr68 Well-Known Member

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    I can totally get it, John, as I know that feeling. Of course, it makes sense, specially in that time and our ages back then. That feeling made watching a movie or attending a concert a very special moment indeed.

    Thanks for sharing this special memory of yours :thumbsup::thumbsup:
     
  16. sabasgr68

    sabasgr68 Well-Known Member

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    Oh yes, yours it´s a very particular history of audio. I´m sure you´ve enjoyed it a lot. Are you still an ipod guy? I´m all mp3 player now from a good while, a simple 8GB sansa clip player -now showing its age, around 8 years I think?-. :)
     
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  17. Rollin Hand

    Rollin Hand Well-Known Member

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    I put Maxell, as that is the only one that I had a lot of. There were some Sony cassettes too, but mostly Maxell.

    We still have my wife's Yamaha deck somewhere, but effed if I know where. I prefer CDs for the most part, because cover art. I sometimes miss the romance of cassettes because of their connection to my youth. I remember well lying in my bed with my portable tape player on listening to Iron Maiden while reading the latest Stephen King. I also loved making mixed tapes. My coup de grace was putting topgether one with "In the Beginning" leading cleanly into "Looks that Kill" a half second later. Perfect.

    I remember leaving my tape of "Hysteria" (oh, can you feel it?) in my first car, which had a sunroof and a hatchback, on a hot day. It formed to the shape of the seat like a Salvador Dali painting. I got an old Maxell tape and put the reels in that casing, and voila! Back in the game.

    I do not miss rewinding side one of a favourite album, or fast-forwarding to the end of a tape because one side was WAAAAAAY longer than the other.
     
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  18. fullonshred

    fullonshred Well-Known Member

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    Of those you listed, TDK and Maxell.

    I bought Fuji when I could get them. Closer to the end of my cassette days I stumbled onto THAT's Tapes, made by Taiyo Yuden Japan. They seemed to be of exceptional quality.

    Here's a short video on the That's Brand.

     
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  19. Chocol8

    Chocol8 Well-Known Member

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    Mostly Maxell tapes dubbed on a Nakamichi double deck. I still have the Nak, but it hasn’t see electricity in about two decades.
     
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  20. sabasgr68

    sabasgr68 Well-Known Member

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    Haha. Yeah, that was me too. I like Stephen King too. Sometimes I re-read some of his books. Like watching a favorite movie several times, I like to read books several times.

    And yes, that was a PITA, and it meant that the batteries will not last enough!

    But cassettes are good memories in the end.
     

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