Will Meet "slow Hand" Clapton Later Today...

Discussion in 'What's left to Talk About?' started by sabasgr68, May 10, 2019.

  1. sabasgr68

    sabasgr68 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2011
    Messages:
    2,425
    Likes Received:
    2,242
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Caracas, Venezuela
    ...on Directv OnStage.

    Rather unthinkable, Directv cable tv is still affordable for us -we split the bill with our landlord-. I don´t watch too much tv in fact, but tonight at 10 pm -local time- there will be a Clapton´s show and I plan to watch it as a second chance of knowing him (his music) better.

    My case is that I haven´t been really moved by his music/playing; he may be considered one of the best, but I have not connected with his music/style. Except for Layla -not the studio recording version; too much happening in the song at the same time. I prefer one of his live perfomances better-, I´ve failed to connect.

    Wanted to share something different than the situation here -I´m really sick and tired of what´s happening, and what´s not happenning here-, and give myself a relaxed time.

    So, what about you? Any love/hate/don´t care Clapton´s playing?

    9:30 pm here, it´s about to start. Will comment later my thoughts :thumbsup:
     
    Lamf77, jamdogg, DonM and 3 others like this.
  2. sabasgr68

    sabasgr68 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2011
    Messages:
    2,425
    Likes Received:
    2,242
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Caracas, Venezuela
    Slow bump
     
  3. tonray

    tonray Well-Known Member Supporting Member+

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2013
    Messages:
    8,656
    Likes Received:
    10,562
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Beautiful Bangkok, Thailand
    I found early Clapton when he played in John Mayall's band to be one of my strongest influences and I still play some of the riffs I learned from listening to hsis earliest works. If I can find some of them and figure out how to send to you I will do so you can see if that might pique your interest.
     
    sabasgr68, Partscaster and DonM like this.

  4. frozensoda

    frozensoda Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2010
    Messages:
    1,077
    Likes Received:
    1,234
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Greater NYC Metro Area
    You have to see him live.
    I couldn’t stop watching, and listening, to him play.
     
    sabasgr68 and DonM like this.
  5. slowhand84

    slowhand84 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    Messages:
    4,793
    Likes Received:
    5,122
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Glad to see you posting here man, I hope you guys are doing OK!

    As for Clapton and stuff like this...it's totally OK to just not dig a particular player. I feel like folks always try to force themselves to get into an artist that just doesn't grab them because they think they must just be missing something, but sometimes that's just how it is.

    I have this issue with Eric Johnson. I know he's an insane musician, and an even more insane guitar player. But for some reason, most of his tunes just kind of don't resonate for me. It used to drive me crazy that ALL of my biggest guitar influences name Johnson as a huge inspiration until I realized that there's so much amazing music out there for a reason - to connect differently with different people. And that's all good :).

    Me personally, I'm not huge on Clapton. I respect his influence, I enjoy his ability to improvise, but it's not music that keeps me coming back to it time and time again.
     
    sabasgr68, wanker and tonray like this.
  6. devdem

    devdem Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2005
    Messages:
    2,542
    Likes Received:
    670
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    I'm a big Clapton fan. I'm one of those that likes a lot of his material from the 90's and 2000's. As he aged, he became a very developed acoustic and electric player. But beyond him, pay attention to the musicians he is playing with. They are all stars in their own right, and all have interesting careers. I think Clapton understands that he is a very good professional, but his musical success leans heavily on his fellow musicians. Get lost in the music for the night and look for the gems that make it a special concert.
     
    sabasgr68 likes this.
  7. DonM

    DonM Well-Known Member Supporting Member+

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2015
    Messages:
    1,869
    Likes Received:
    2,327
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Henderson, NV/SLC, UT
    He's always been my favorite.
     
    sabasgr68 likes this.
  8. Partscaster

    Partscaster Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2012
    Messages:
    2,901
    Likes Received:
    3,680
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    NH
    I love his early and mid years stuff such as Bluesbreakers, Cream, Blind Faith, and the Derek and the Dominoes stuff, and beyond up to and including Slowhand. Saw him in mid 80's. I hope you enjoyed the show, Sabas.
     
    sabasgr68 and tonray like this.
  9. toomanycats

    toomanycats Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2014
    Messages:
    7,873
    Likes Received:
    17,853
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    North Carolina
    It's fascinating that Clapton is a player who people alternately think is the greatest ever or who bores them to death. I believe this wide disparity in opinions can in part be attributed to his very uneven output.

    Between 66 and 69 when Clapton was improvising with a Gibson in his hands, plugged into a Marshall, he was a truly amazing.

    Likewise, there are moments in the 70s when he creates some of the sweetest vintage Strat tones you'll ever hear. When he was on he was really on.

    In my opinion a lot of Clapton's output from the 80s on sounded like filler, stuff that was just phoned on.

    Eric made a huge impact very early on in three distinct areas:

    1) A master of electric blues guitar.
    2) An innovator in the use of gear and the creation of pioneering hard rock tone.
    3) Was a member of a supergroup which was the template for the hard rock/heavy metal to follow.

    In a way he could only go down from there. How can your older, tired, jaded, exhausted self ever compete with your youthful, energetic, optimistic, foolhardy self? In fact, Eric didn't even try to. He went in a completely different direction.

    I didn't appreciate Clapton's greatness until relatively recently. I finally came around to a deep appreciation of Clapton by way of learning some of his best solos note for note. Namely, "Steppin' Out" from the John Mayall era, "Crossroads" from the Cream era, and "Worried Life Blues" from his solo career in 1979. Learn these and you'll understand what I'm talking about.

    While what I've said here is focused on Clapton the guitar player, there is much that can be said about him as a songwriter, vocalist, producer, and general ambassador for the blues. The mans overall impact is massive.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2019
  10. Perfect Stranger

    Perfect Stranger Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Messages:
    16,406
    Likes Received:
    8,136
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    just leaving your mama's bedroom!
    I love his playing! I don't listen to his hits coz they are worn slap out. One of the best techniques I've ever heard.
     
    sabasgr68 likes this.
  11. stormin1155

    stormin1155 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2008
    Messages:
    2,975
    Likes Received:
    1,869
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I think one of the problems with Clapton as a guitar god is that his influence is so widespread that it sounds common. Kind of like saying EVH is overhyped because every 15-year-old kid you hear at Guitar Center is playing Eruption. It's hard to find ANY guitar player that ISN'T influenced by Clapton, even if they don't listen to him, because he has influenced the players they do listen to.
     
    Chocol8, sabasgr68 and toomanycats like this.
  12. andrewsrea

    andrewsrea Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Messages:
    7,854
    Likes Received:
    6,674
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Lake St. Louis, MO
    ^ What @toomanycats said. Folks either love him or hate him. I hear he is a bit prickly as a person.

    For me when he isn't noodling to try and live up to his guitar God rep, he is one of the best at what needs to be in a song.
     
    sabasgr68 and toomanycats like this.
  13. PsychoCid

    PsychoCid Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2009
    Messages:
    23,619
    Likes Received:
    16,771
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    SoCal
    Love/hate is usually a sign of greatness. If something is powerful it creates strong responses. I use the same philosophy to gauge movies....I don't care if people say it's good or it's bad. If they're bothering to spend time talking about it, it's definitely interesting. If it wasn't interesting, they wouldn't have mentioned either way.

    RE: I dunno, older/more experienced men tend to out compete young men with anything that requires strategy and thinking. It's only in sports and agnst that young men have the advantage. Even in sports, well...I mean haven't you ever heard of "old man strength"? Sometimes old guys just have a control of their muscles that younger, technically beefier guys haven't developed.

    It's the angst that dissipates with age. A spark, a fire, an energy that is heavily dependant on youth...
     
  14. toomanycats

    toomanycats Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2014
    Messages:
    7,873
    Likes Received:
    17,853
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    North Carolina
    You mean this. :)

    testosterone-molecule.jpg

    Clapton + the molecule illustrated above in abundance.
    Eric Clapton Cream Publicity Still.jpg
     
  15. Lamf77

    Lamf77 Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2013
    Messages:
    4,547
    Likes Received:
    5,500
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Always have to post one of my favorite Clapton videos. Not only great playing, but vocals are emotional and just outstanding. Clapton often seem to shine the brightest when the event is not about "him".
    Steve Cropper in admiration at @5:47 tops it off.

     
    DonM and sabasgr68 like this.
  16. PsychoCid

    PsychoCid Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2009
    Messages:
    23,619
    Likes Received:
    16,771
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    SoCal
    Yes I'm sure that's a part of it. Some old men put out tons of testosterone though, I believe.

    As a mammalien example, there's one old dog next door who's a "big dog" but on the smaller side of big dogs. He's 15 years old, ancient and nearly blind. But he just reeks of testosterone. Girls go nuts around him.

    Now back to humans ....many human females have told me that guys _only_ get better with age. It's not just how much testosterone you have. It's how you use it. Is the pressure applied smoothly and strategically (experience) or wild and rambunctiously (youth).
     
    sabasgr68 likes this.
  17. Chocol8

    Chocol8 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2010
    Messages:
    8,046
    Likes Received:
    9,409
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Western NY
    I am a big fan of a lot of his stuff, but there is also a lot I also don’t care for.

    As a guitar player, when at his best, I don’t think there is anyone I enjoy more.
     
    sabasgr68 likes this.
  18. sabasgr68

    sabasgr68 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2011
    Messages:
    2,425
    Likes Received:
    2,242
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Caracas, Venezuela
    Haha, well, this Clapton thing went into testosterone field. :smile:

    One thing I can say about older -or better: more experienced- players/bands is that many of them sound/play better when the years are behind them. I think that one big reason for it is that they no longer need/have to prove anything, so they act more like themselves, and they are supposed to be better as well. Maybe I´m wrong, but I think it has to do a lot with it.

    Will look for that Mayall/Clapton material. Even if I don´t get hooked by, it´s always interesting to know the roots of great artists.
    Most of times I can watch YT videos, so you can share YT links.

    I do actually prefer to watch/listen live presentations, that way I can listen to what they can really do -and you can therefore decide if you really like them-. Live presentations are the test field to know if artists have it or not. The last time I attended a live performance here was in 1991 or 1992, it was REO Speedwagon...

    Thanks, slowhand! -short answer: yes, we are doing OK:sweatsmile:-

    I know what you mean, and I´m glad you pointed it out because that´s a feeling I had with some players. Then I realize: I like what I like. Not saying that X players are not good -actually, the one that sucks is me haha!-, just that I´m not into them. But I admit that there was a time that I felt unsure about what I was not seeing that other could! For example, being them the monsters they are, I realized that most -if not all- of their music were not for me: Satriani (I even bought a CD and listened for days trying to force myself to like him, but although it wasn´t bad, I was not hooked. I´m talking 1991-92 I think.), Steve Vai, Eric Johnson, Batio, and others. But as you said, if the music does not resonate for me, it just doesn´t, and that´s it. It´s not a matter of big importance.

    Regarding Clapton, I still wanna go the distance after what´s been said in this thread.

    PD: I thought you were a diehard Clapton´s fan because of your handle :ROFLMAO:. was I wrong:)


    I can see that I have to listen to his earlier work, as most of you have made references to it. Regarding this specific concert (Slowhand at 70) I found there were big names playing with him. That´s interesting for sure.


    Enjoyed it, and the respect for him as a player/musician has not changed, regardless of being hooked or not. The scenary and lights were simple, and I prefer shows that way. As othes have stated, as well as you, seems like I should listen to his early work. :thumbsup:

    Interesting points, John.

    Will look for that solos, as I´m always trying to get to the deeps of music creations.

    It´s clear that he´s heavily influenced by blues, and that will define if one´s to like his music -if you´re not much of a blues lover, I guess you won´t feel that attracted to that kind of music-.

    I am very impressed, as I´ve seen in other videos, about his ability to bend with his ring finger only. Very impressed.

    It´s out of the scope of this thread, but since you mentioned it, have I told you about the movie Rudderless? I loved it. Has so much in it, that it has become one of my favorites. Go watch it if you haven´t.


    Have to say that this video has it. There´s a live Layla video -can´t remember the year- that I liked his playing/singing a lot.


    I can relate to this too. It´s unusual that you like all the music of X artist. When at his best it´s the phrase that kills it, I think.



    In general, I liked the show. I´m a natural music person, so I like music performances.

    I´ve found that specially with guitar solos and riffs and fillers -and I admit I´m somewhat picky about it-, if they don´t have a purpose in the song, if they don´t complement the message, if they don´t lift you or move you, if they seem to not belong, they are pointless; they are just being there but doing nothing. If you are supposedly listening to the work of a guitar player, it doesn´t matter if he´s a legend or not, you expect to hear some good guitars along with the music and the lyrics -except we´re talking instrumental only artists-.

    While I have not really listened to a lot of his stuff
    , but according to what I´ve listened of his music -and this applies perfectly to other artists/bands as well-, that´s what I´ve felt about some of his songs. While some are definitely good, others lack this point IMHO. I had his album Pilgrim, and I don´t remember to have found something remarkable there. I remember I liked My Father´s Eyes. Is it a good Clapton´s album reference? Of course, I was expecting some lots of rock guitars in there; maybe it´s my fault for not having any knowledge of his career up to that moment?

    My point is I don´t really know his work, and I have began to have some interest on knowing it better.

    Music perception being subjective, it´s not uncommon to find that one person loves a song, and one another simply dislikes it. So i guess it all depends on if the song touches you or not. There will always be lots of fans for every music style.

    So, in my case particularly, while still not hooked, I do appreciate Clapton´s talent and career, and can certainly enjoy some of his stuff.
     
    DonM, Partscaster and PsychoCid like this.
  19. LessPawl

    LessPawl Well-Known Member Supporting Member+ Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2014
    Messages:
    7,420
    Likes Received:
    6,798
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    USA
    I love a lot of Clapton's stuff, and i'm not a fan of some of his other stuff. Aside from his raw talent, which in my mind is very good, he's a very interesting guy. I've read a ton of stuff about him, and the dude has had a lot of major ups and downs in his life. He's enjoyable as heck to see LIVE, or at least he was back in the day. We saw him a bunch of times. He's in the rare air category in my book, but I'm not sure if he's in my top ten list or not. He's an old dude now and rarely plays, as he has developed some sort of nerve condition, from what I've read. He'll always be one of the guitar players that i consider to be someone I strive to play like. (His slower, easier stuff, of course) In his prime, he could really rip it up. I like him with a Strat or a 335 far more than him with a fine Lester. But that's just me.
     
  20. devdem

    devdem Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2005
    Messages:
    2,542
    Likes Received:
    670
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    Regarding Pilgrim, I wouldn't say it's representative of his work - I think he noted in an interview it as an aside. He went into the studio with his manager or engineer and they just put together an album without a lot of other musicians.

    A few years later he put out Reptile, which is one of my favorite more mature clapton albums. He's got Doyle Bramhall II playing with him as sidekick on that album. Great album.

    For acoustic, of course there is the live Unplugged album from the early 90's where he really shows his talent. Also Me and Mr had some very interesting early 20th century songs from one of his biggest influences, Robert Johnson.

    His 60's and 70's blues rock playing is powerful. But his later-in-life playing draws from a much wider palette if you're interested in that sort of thing.

    There are a lot of duds he had along the way, especially in the later 70's and 80s.

    Hope you enjoyed the show!
     

Share This Page