Woodworking Q: Enlarging A Drilled Hole?

Discussion in 'Project Depot' started by glasshand, Jul 16, 2019.

  1. jaxjaxon

    jaxjaxon New Member

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    This is what I would do use the 6.5 mm drill bit first wrap sand paper around the drill bit drill down let the sandpaper widen the hole some, then go up a size in drill bits that will fit with the sand paper and enlarge the hole some more . going till you have the size you need. The reason for sandpaper is you should not have to worry about cracking or chiping the finish. It will take longer but you can get more of a precise fit for the collar
     
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  2. glasshand

    glasshand Well-Known Member

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    Lots of good tips here! I really appreciate all the advice and suggestions. Like @Rollin Hand said, the actual pivot points of the posts themselves are the same size, but the bushings are bigger, hence the need to increase the hole evenly. But this is a good excuse for me to get a drill press. Years ago, when I was building my "taxicaster", one of the lessons I learned was "always use the drill press", and this is the right time to get one. So my plan is
    - line up the body on the press using the old bushing or a bit to center it
    - use a step bit to enlarge the opening a little to the correct size
    - use a forstner bit to drill the larger hole to depth
    Sound reasonable?

    There's no finish so I don't have to worry about damaging it although of course I'd still rather not have any tearout. One of the unusual things about this Peavey body is that the original holes are actually partly open at the bottom where they hit the trem cavity.
     
  3. Rollin Hand

    Rollin Hand Well-Known Member

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    I have a guitar that probably is surplus now that I have the Wolfgang, but it looks like a Wolfgang, and I LOVE the neck, so I am keeping it. One of the trem posts isn't straight, so I will likely do the fill and drill thing on it (or have it done). It strikes me as worth it to have these things go in dead straight, thus eliminating a potential binding point.

    Once I was getting new the post holes drilled on a guitar as part of a guitar building class, and the teacher was helping me to do it in his garage. Another classmate showed up and knocked on the door, just has he was drilling the second hole. The surprise caused him to go clear through the body. Yay, epoxy wood filler!
     

  4. glasshand

    glasshand Well-Known Member

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    So, having decided to go this route, I got the drill press, and I carefully made a bunch of test holes in scrap, tested enlarging existing holes, carefully test-fitted the bushings in the holes, etc. All was going pretty well. The holes were nice and neat, and 3/8" seemed like a pretty good size for the bushings, just as I'd read. Then I went to eyeball setting up the actual guitar body.

    Hey, kiddies, guess what a real important measurement is in drill presses? It's called "swing", and it refers to the distance between the center of the chuck and the support column, multiplied by 2 just to be confusing. Guess how much swing your old uncle Glasshand's drill press has? Eight, which means four inches between the chuck and the column! Now how much do you think he needs? If you guessed twelve, which means six inches of distance, you win! Uncle Glasshand, however, does not win. He gets to sit there glaring sullenly at a drill press that is of no use to him and a guitar body he can't fix today.

    Looks like my options are to beg, borrow, steal, or buy a 13" or larger drill press, or do this a different way.

    EDIT: Drill guide, maybe?
     
  5. mozz

    mozz Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    If you are just enlarging a pot hole, use a hand reamer.
     
  6. glasshand

    glasshand Well-Known Member

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    I would, but this is for bridge studs, or bushing, or whatever they're called, so some precision is called for. It's a shame, because I was getting really nice holes in my test pieces.
     
  7. mozz

    mozz Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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  8. honyock

    honyock Well-Known Member

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    you can center it first and use a forstener. I have chucked up a bolt with the correct thread for the anchor and centered it that way. Remove the anchor/bolt and insert forstner bit and drill.

    I have a non slip pad I use under the body on my stage that keeps it from moving.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
     
  9. glasshand

    glasshand Well-Known Member

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    Got a forstner bit, actually. It's just the centering and proper 90 degree angle that are concerning me.
     
  10. stevebway

    stevebway Metaphysician & Ham

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    I've used a hand reamer ( nice new one )for decades.
     
  11. glasshand

    glasshand Well-Known Member

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    Success! I acquired a drill guide (the Milescraft 1318 Drillmate) and went very carefully to town today. After a few tests in scrap, I lined up the drill guide and enlarged the hole mouth using a step bit, then switched to the Forstner. The holes were nice and neat and the new bushings went in very snugly but without needing excessive force.

    Thanks to everyone for their advice and suggestions!
     
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  12. tobijohn

    tobijohn The Great Enabler Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

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    So you had no alignment problems just resting it on the body while you drilled down and enlarged the holes?
     
  13. glasshand

    glasshand Well-Known Member

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    No issues. I could have clamped it, I guess, but once you have the guide carefully lined up and you're pressing down, it isn't likely to move.
     
  14. nomadh

    nomadh Well-Known Member

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    I'm still trying to understand the problem. A guitar body is less than 4" thick. Shouldn't your drill press be fine. Drilling a hole in the side of a body would be a problem but why the top?
    Sorry, I'm missing it and the fix. Any pics?
     
  15. honyock

    honyock Well-Known Member

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    swing is distance from the pole to the chuck, the posts are probably near the widest part of body, so you need a drill press that has a swing greater than half width of the guitar body.

    the amount a drill press can plunge would not be the issue here.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
     
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  16. glasshand

    glasshand Well-Known Member

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  17. nomadh

    nomadh Well-Known Member

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    Ohhh the depth back to the pole. Or the throat. The lovelace depth. I can see how you did all the work and completely missed this. I sure wasn't seeing it.
     

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